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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
of using it as an extension of their foreign policy. they have generally been fuelling and funding this for many decades. the algearians need to be confronted. if you are going to be taken seriously, you cannot support terrorist groups either inside or outside their borders. >> michael: and the about that they operated almost unilaterally in trying to free the hostages speaks to that they need to be confronted on that. the book is "leading from behind." richard miniter thanks for being here in "the war room." coming up it's the one time americans get to say to the british, see we can do pomp and circumstance just as well as you can. and republican leaders are on a secret retreat. we'll let you in on that secret. and later, the man, the myth, the legend that's right joe biden's exploits are pit to paper. it's a friday night in "the war room," and we're just getting started, so stick around. [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? irene
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
at the president pulls a second term, this focusing on foreign policy and thand domestic issues. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations united compare that with, today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington post generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world also oppressed. -- world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed earlier. why is the president having two swearing-in ceremonies? according to the inaugural committee, it has happened on six previous occasion
it a foreign policy of hope and change. a change, and you let it happen and you hope it works out. you hope the secularists, when in actuality we know who's filled that vacuum it's been al-qaeda, and from libya and syria trying to take down the regime in egypt. in algeria, mali, across the board they're on the roll and this administration refuses to acknowledge it it. >> brian: what's interesting, whether you agree with president bush or not, he had a freedom agenda, would put advisors on the ground or domestic forces and go in there in quick strike operations. what is this president's mission, is it all about drones with hell-fire missiles? >> it seems like, afghanistan we're headed for the exits even sooner than he talked about on the campaign trail. he's got the quote, flexibility for the second term. i think he believes that with drone strikes and special operators he can affect things enough and anybody who's been on the ground knows it's intelligence on the ground, relationships, even if it's not a massive war front bilike iraq or afghanistan, it's events on the ground that affect not
of foreign policy, andy. good to have you here. good to see you. on the subject of foreign policy the president said the following in part: we are heirs to those who want peace and not just the war who turn sworn enemies into the surest of friends-- >> i've lost the audio. >> megyn: unfortunately we've lost the audio, you can hear anddy say. we'll try to get those reestablished and these are the dangers of live tv and these are the official vases. >> inaugural gifts. >> megyn: the one that was presented to the vice-president joe biden has a more springtime etching on the side of it and we'll take a brief listen and eric cantor and the president and first lady standing up. [applause] [applause] >> the toasts are coming up right after this. and this is in by the way, statuary hall. this used to be long, long ago, the hold house chamber, now it is the area in front of where the house of representatives is. there's a statue of nearly every state in statuary hall and the halls around that area, as we see the president and vice-president receiving those gifts. >> megyn: it wasn't the b
. in that it was almost entirely about foreign policy. we would go anywhere, bear any price, pay any price, bear any burden to ensure the survival of liberty. this time, the president's foreign policy really was disspilled into seven words, a decade of war is now ending, the contrast of the last half century is striking. >> and jonathan karl who covers the white house for us, jon, i know you're in the capitol steps, the president saying we can't succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone yet the bulk of the speech really praised and support and encouragement for all the things we do together through our government. >> george, i felt during much of that speech like i was listening to a democratic ronald reagan where reagan was unapologetically conservative. this was unapologetically progressive saying we must act collectively. and this was also bound with optimism saying america's possibilities are limitless. this was an effort, i believe, at that kind of optimistic progressivism whereas a reagan was your optimistic conservatism. also, i was very struck by on
fiscal cliff discussion, the economy is going to get zooming, we're going to -- foreign policy. >> it could end up being in foreign policy, drawing down troops, transitioning to this new kind of fighting force with the drone warfare, sort of in keeping with what we're alluding to eisenhower had. >> i think we're going to watch too very different but equally fascinating dramas play out. inside washington, the republicans still have the votes to stop the president on many things. they still control the house. they still have operational gridlock in the senate, if you will, even though democrats picked up. inside washington, the president has a challenge. but if you look at this, groundbreaking on gaye rights, back to climate change, gun control, immigration. and who that appeals to, as jack just said. they have made a doubling down of what they did in the campaign. they believe they have the coalition of the future -- young people, latinos, african-americans, and they believe the republican coalition is aging, in decline, and fractured. so they think politically they have the jui
of the second administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for b
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)